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Historic, Archive Document 

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Foreign 

Agricultural 

Service 


FCOF-1^ 
January 1985 



Foreig n Agriculturq^#1 rcu lar 

CoffOG FEB 5 -5 

World Coffee Situation 


WORLD COFFEE SITUATION 
Summary and Outlook 


The second USDA world coffee crop estimate for 1984/85 is 93.6 million 
bags 1/, 1 percent above the June 1984 forecast and 4 percent more than the 
1983/5^4 harvest. These figures differ from those released on 
December 5, 1984, because estimates for El Salvador and Rwanda have been 
revised. Brazil is expected to produce 27 million bags in 1984/85, down 10 
percent from last year. Early season conditions have been good for the 
1985/86 crop, with favorable weather prevailing throughout the major 
coffee-producing states. Colombia's 1984/85 coffee crop estimate is unchanged 
from the June forecast, but 2 percent below last year. Most of the major 
North and Central American coffee producing countries are expecting 
increases. A much larger crop in the Ivory Coast will raise Africa's 1984/85 
output 19 percent above 1983/84 while a dramatic turnaround in India will 
increase Asia's and Oceania's production by 16 percent. 

World coffee exports reached an estimated 67.8 million bags during crop year 
1983/84, up 2.9 million from 1982/83. A further 1 .4-mill ion -bag increase in 
exports is expected for 1984/85. If USDA's estimates for production, 
domestic use and exports by producing countries are correct, world coffee 
stocks would increase by 3.2 million bags during 1984/85 to end the year at 
48.5 million. In all cases, the stock figures are gross and may, therefore, 
contain substantial quantities— possibly as much as 5 million bags— of 
non-exportable quality coffee. 


T7 Unless indicated otherwise, production and trade figures are given in 
terms of 60 kilogram bags (132.276 lbs.). Area is given in hectares (2.471 
acres). GBE means "green bean equivalent." 


Approved by the World Agricultural Outlook Board - USDA 


SUPPLY AND DISTRIBUTION 


World Coffee Production 


Most of the coffee produced in the world today can be classified as either 
Arabica or Robusta. In 1984/85, about 68.7 million bags or 73.4 percent of 
world output will be Arabica, down from 71.2 million or 78.8 percent of the 
1983/84 crop. A relatively greater expansion has occurred in Robusta 
producing countries over the past 25 years. Within countries which produce 
both, such as Brazil, Cameroon and Ecuador, the higher yielding, more disease 
resistant Robusta species have been preferred. Estimated output by type has 
developed as follows: 


: Production Arabica Robusta Other !_/ 

Crop Year : (1 ,000 bags) — (Percent) — - 

1W6T so — 

1965/66....: 82,157 79.9 19.8 .3 

1970/71....: 59,426 70.0 19.5 .5 

1975/76....: 73,109 76.0 23.7 .3 

1980/81....: 86,344 73.3 26.4 .3 

1983/84....: 90,359 78.7 20.9 .4 

1984/85....: 93,608 73.4 26.3 .3 


T7 Mainly Liberia. 


f, 

Exports 

World coffee exports are now expected to total 69.2 million bags during crop 
year 1984/85, 2 percent over 1983/84. Members of the International Coffee 
Organization (ICO) will probably export 58.0 to 59.5 million bags to member 
importing countries and 9.5 to 10.5 million to non-member countries. Now that 
Cuba has joined the ICO, non-member shipments should total no more than 
250,000 bags including 150,000 to members and 100,000 to non-members. 

Coffee exports by ICO exporting members in October and November 1984 totaled 
only about 46 percent of the October/December 1984 export quota. October 
shipments were at the lowest level in six years. Robusta exports for the 
month were only 600,000 bags as compared to the 1.6 million bags shipped in 
October 1983. 

The tightening of ICO control measures to reduce the flow of coffee that is 
supposedly destined for non-member countries but seeps back into member 
country markets have not had a significant effect on total shipments to 
non-members. This could indicate that most non-member shipments are actually 
consumed in the non-member country or that the new control measures have not 


2 


been successful. A number of exporting members are having difficulty 
confirming that their non-member exports actually reach the non-member 
destination as now required by the ICO. 


COFFEE SHIPMENTS TO NON-MEMBER COUNTRIES 
(1 ,000 bags) 


TToTFeeTeTrs 


Exporting Group 


jmm 


1951 /eg 


1983/84 


Colombia Mild : 1 ,122 1 ,609 999 1 ,059 

Other Mild Arabicas : 1 ,932 2,598 4,861 3,437 

Brazil & Other Arabicas....: 2,749 1,681 1,907 3,003 

Robustas : 1 ,930 3,097 2,627 2,368 


Total 1/ : 7,732 8,984 10,394 9,867 


T7 Totals may not add due to rounding 


Sales to non-members by Brazil, which had led the fight against such sales, 
showed the largest percentage increase. The following were the largest 
exporters of coffee to non-members in 1983/84 with 1982/83 comparisons: 


TW?787~~ 1983/84 ' '% CTia'hge~ 

Thousands of Bags 


Colombia : 709 836 +18 

Costa Rica : 609 571 - 6 

Mexico : 1 ,231 852 -31 

Brazil : 1 ,735 2,821 +63 

Indonesia : 1 ,567 1 ,997 +27 


The price spread between coffee sold to members and non-members averaged about 
69 cents per pound in 1983/84 up from a 39 cent!/ spread in 1982/83. Price 
discounts for non-agreement coffee continue to threaten the smooth functioning 
of the agreement as well as the continued participation of existing members. 

1/ Oct. -June 


3 


WORLD CONSUMPTION 


Disappearance in importing countries rose only marginally between coffee years 
(October/September) 1982/83 and 1983/84 from 56,710,000 bags to 56,952,000 
bags. Disappearance is derived on the basis of the data on net imports of all 
forms of coffee adjusted for changes in visible inventories. 


IMPORTS OF GREEN COFFEE BY SELECTED COFFEE CONSUMING COUNTRIES 

(60 kg bags) 


Country 

Period 

1983 

1984 

Percent 

Change 

Japan 

Jan. /Nov. 

3,063,325 

3,493,578 


14.0 

Swi tzerl and 

Jan. /Nov. 

'91 4, '970 

'912'S33 

_ 

0.2 

United States.... 

Jan. /Oct. 

13,815,873 

15,419,331 

+ 

11.6 

West Germany 

Jan. /Oct. 

6,007,781 

5,900,038 


1.8 

France 

Jan. /Oct. 

4 '393 ',003 

3 ',993 ',237 


9.1 

United Kingdom... 

Jan. /Oct. 

i;325;265 

i;575,'375 

+ 

18.9 

Finland 

Jan. /Oct. 

893,641 

889,728 


0.4 

Austria 

Jan. /Oct. 

867'053 

723^228 


16.6 

Netherl ands 

Jan. /Sept. 

1 ,809,691 

1 ,778,859 


1.7 

Sweden 

Jan. /Sept. 

1 ,'068,'792 

1 ,'126^299 


5.4 

Denmark 

Jan. /Sept. 

'599 ',255 

'580 ',940 

_ 

3.1 

Italy 

Jan. /Aug. 

2,631 ,000 

2,289,000 


13.0 

Canada 

Jan. /Aug. 

'913J60 

'989; 383 

+ 

8.3 

Norway 

Jan. /June 

316,155 

348,433 

+ 

10.2 

Bel gium/Lux 

. Jan. /Mar. 

351 ,608 

443,212 

+ 

26.1 

Total 


18,970,572 

40,463,474 

+ 

00 

• 

CO 


SOURCE: Official Statistics and trade sources. Compiled by the George Gordon 

Paton and Co. , Inc. 


World coffee consumption, according to the ICO, is forecast to rise about 1 
percent during 1984/85, bringing total disappearance to about 58.0 million 
bags. 


4 


World Coffee Stocks 


Over 90 percent of the world's coffee stocks are still held by producers and 
the amount they hold has continued to increase although now there is a growing 
concern about quality. Stocks held by producing countries are forecast to 
increase by about 3.2 million bags during the current crop year. At this 
level stocks represent 53 percent of anticipated world consumption for the 
year and 70 percent of exports. The ICO has begun a study to determine what 
portion of these stocks are of export quality. 

While some countries such as the Ivory Coast were extremely hard pressed to 
meet their ICO quota for 1983/84, others with heavy stocks and financial 
problems continued to seek outlets in non-ICO markets at substantially reduced 
prices. The largest stocks are held by Brazil and Colombia (Table 4). 

The location of carryover stocks at year's end is estimated as follows: 


Location 

Crop Year 

1983/84 1984/85 

North America, Central 
America and Caribbean 

(1 ,000 bags) 

6,375 6,721 

23,210 24,488 

12,714 13,838 

2,971 3,416 

South America 

Africa 

Asia & Oceania 

World Total 

45,270 48,463 


Inventories in importing member countries of the ICO have decreased from 4.5 
million bags on June 30, 1983, to about 3.9 million bags a year later. Stocks 
in the United States are estimated to have decreased from 1.2 million bags to 
600,000 bags over that period. 


U.S. SITUATION 


U.S. Imports 

U.S. imports of green coffee during October 1973/September 1984 totaled 
18.1 million bags, valued at 3.09 bill ion--this is up 6 percent in volume and 
17 percent in value from year-earlier levels. The unit import value for 
September was $1.31 per pound, compared with $1.20 per pound in October 1983. 
A comparison of U.S. imports by countries of origin for coffee years 1982/83 
and 1983/84 appears in Table 5. 


5 


U.S. Coffee Consumption V 


The United States is the largest single market for coffee in the world. Data 
collected by the International Coffee Organization for its Annual World Coffee 
Drinking Study shows a long-term decline in coffee consumption in the United 
States on a per capita basis. The following graph shows the trend in cups 
consumed per person per day and the percentage of the population drinking 
coffee for the past 40 years. 


COFFEE CONSUMPTION IN THE UNITED STATES 
PER CAPITA CONSUMPTION AND PERCENTAGE DRINKING 

1950-84 



Horticultural and Tropical Products Division 

CoMModi ty Proyrans, FAS, USDA 

Source: International Coffee Organization 


There was an increase in the proportion of people drinking decaffeinated 
coffee from 15.3 percent in 1983 to 17.7 percent in 1984. On the basis of cup 
consumption, decaffeinated coffee accounts for 22 percent of all coffee 
consumed, about equally divided between regular and soluble coffee. While the 
rate of coffee consumption increased for nearly all groups, consumption 
continues to be highest among persons in the older age groups. Although 
coffee consumption has decreased significantly since 1962, coffee remained the 
most popular beverage in 1984, narrowly edging the percentage consuming soft 
drinks. 


T7 Information in this section is based on the ICO's Coffee Drinking Study, 
United States of America, Winter 1984. 


6 


According to information provided by the George Gordon Patton & Co., Inc., 
from a representative group of United States roasters, the amount of green 
coffee roasted in the United States (including the amount used in the 
production of soluble coffee) to December 1, 1984, was approximately 102.9 
percent of the amount roasted in a comparable period last year and about 100.9 
percent of the amount roasted in 1982. 

The Bureau of Labor statistics reports the wholesale price of a 1 -pound can of 
ground roast coffee during November 1984 averaged $2.58, up from $2.46 per 
pound 1 year earlier. Wholesale prices for soluble coffee rose from $7.44 per 
16 ozs. in November 1983 to $7.94 for the same month in 1984. 


INTERNATIONAL COFFEE ORGANIZATION 


On October 1, 1984, member countries of the International Coffee Organization 
(ICO) agreed on a system for coffee year 1984/85 (October/September) aimed at 
bringing market supply and demand among members into equilibrium at $1.30 per 
pound. While producing countries had sought to restrict exports and raise 
prices, major consuming countries for whom coffee prices had been artificially 
high in view of the large overall world supply, opted for an agreement which 
would bring prices back into the middle range of the price band set for 
1983/84. For West Europeans and other non-U. S. importers, high coffee prices 
have been exacerbated by the strength of the dollar. 

Quotas 


Under the terms of the agreement reached on October 1, the annual global quota 
would be set at 59.0 million bags for 1984/85 within a 54.0-64.0 million bag 
range. The ICO's price defense system has an outer range of $1.15-$1.45 and a 
preferred inner range of $1.20-$1.40 per pound. When prices rise to or above 
$1.40 and remain there for 15 days two additional 1.0 million-bag increments 
would be released. A rise to the outer range of the price ceiling would 
trigger two more increases of a larger magnitude (1.5 million bags). 
Corresponding quota cuts would occur as the market price falls to or below 
$1.15 per pound. A system of quota withdrawals and restorations operates 
within the outer range of the price defense mechanism. The market price 
directed quota system can be suspended if the 15-day moving average of the 
Composite Indicator Price remains at or above $1.50075 for (1) a minimum of 30 
consecutive market days and all pro rata upward adjustments have been applied, 
or (2) for 45 days provided all remaining releases are applied on the date on 
which the 15-day ICO indicator price reaches $1.50075. 

While global supply/demand equilibrium among member countries of the ICO at 
about $1.30 per pound was expected with a 59.0-million bag global quota, the 
effective initial annual quota for coffee year 1984/85 was set at 61 million 
bags. The 2 million bag increase was regarded as already earned based on the 
market price level existing on entry into the new year. One of the two 
increases would be withdrawn if the 15-day moving average price fell to or 
below $1.35 per pound and the second when it fell to or below $1.30. 


7 


The new agreement also involved the "front loading" of annual quotas so that 
more coffee would be available during the first quarter to overcome a shortage 
of Robusta, the result of poor crops among members of the Organization of 
African and Malagasy Coffee Producers (OAMCAF). In order to increase the 
supply of Robusta available in the market, three non-OAMCAF producers of this 
type of coffee were issued export stamps for 35 percent of their annual export 
quota for 1984/85 for use during the first quarter. Stamps for an additional 
15 percent would be issued for the second quarter with the balance divided for 
use during the remaining two quarters. OAMCAF countries are allocated 25 
percent of their stamps per quarter. All other basic quota countries received 
27.62 percent of their annual allotment of stamps for use during the first 
quarter with 24.12 or 24.13 percent to be distributed for use in each of the 
remaining three quarters. 

On December 13, 1984, the ICO's 15-day moving average indicator price fell to 
134.76 cents per pound, triggering an immediate 1 million bag withdrawal from 
the 61 -mil lion bag global quota established in September. The withdrawal was 
distributed among ICO exporters with a basic quota in accordance with their 
percentage shares of the overall quota. (Table 8.) 

Market Shares 


The percentage formula developed by the ICO whereby, individual member quotas 
were to be based 70 percent on export history and 30 percent on stocks, was 
again abandoned in favor of an ad-hoc arrangement. Exporting member shares of 
the global quota are essentially unchanged from the 1982/83-1983/84 
arrangement and will remain in effect for the next two years. (Table 6.) The 
arrangement does not favor countries holding large stocks. The bulk 
(55,112,500 bags) was allocated to exporting members entitled to a basic 
quota, other than Angola, according to procedures shown in Columns (1) to (4) 
of Table 7. Column 3 of the table indicates special allocations for 1984/85 
totaling 365,000 bags which are not subject to change or to be included as 
part of the global quota for purposes of redistributing shortfalls. 

Members exempt from basic quotas 

Countries exempt from basic quotas, generally those with quotas of less than 
400,000 bags and not subject to quota cuts and increases, are authorized 
4.25 percent of the initial annual global quota. (Table 9.) The shares are 
adjusted to account for changes in membership. 

Several countries received special allocations which are not subject to 
increases or reductions. These allocations which are shown in column 3 of 
Table 9 also cannot be included as part of the global annual quota for 
purposes of redistributing shortfalls for individual members. Members exempt 
from basic quotas exporting more than 100,000 bags are subject to quarterly 
quotas while those exporting 100,000 bags or less can export their entitlement 
at any time during the coffee year. 


8 


Prices 


The main reason the United States joined the ICO was to help smooth price 
adjustments around a long term price trend, not to establish a cartel to rig 
prices. (Figure 1.) The primary concern of U.S. negotiators for coffee year 
1984/85 was the establishment of a global quota sufficiently large to put 
effective downward pressure on prices and to stabilize them in the mid-range 
of the price band. Despite a global quota for 1983/84 of 60.2 million bags 
which included four upward adjustments and an initial 700,000 bag increase, 
prices remained above $1.40 per pound in terms of the 15-day moving average of 
the Composite Indicator Price (CIP) which controls coffee quotas, for much of 
the year. 

The price situation during 1983/84 was not believed consistent with the longer 
term trend. When quotas were reintroduced in October 1980, the indicator 
price had fallen from post Brazil frost highs of over $3.26 to about $1.20. 
Prices averaged about $1.11 per pound in 1980/81 and about $1.25 per pound in 
both 1981/82 and 1982/83. During 1983/84 the 15-day indicator price rose from 
$1.25 in October to $1.50 on June 1 with the daily price having reached a high 
of $1.56 on May 21. The 15-day CIP was above $1.40 at year's end. 

ICO COMPOSITE INDICATOR PRICES 


U.S. Cents Per Pound 
1981 1982 1983 1984 1/ 


Unwashed Arabicas : 179.6 143.7 142.8 150.9 

Colombian Mil ds : 145.3 148.6 141 .6 149.3 

Other Mi Ids : 128.1 139.9 131.7 146.0 

Robustas : 102.9 111.1 124.1 139.8 

Composite 2/ : 115.5 125.5 128.0 142.9 


T7 Jan. /Sept, average. 


A number of factors appear to have contributed to the higher prices in 1983/84 
including (1) severe problems with coffee quality in Brazil, (2) weather 
related crop shortages and transportation problems in a number of the major 
Robusta producing countries, and (3) an increasing concern about the existence 
and export quality of stocks in many exporting countries. The prospect of 
frosts in Brazil traditionally heighten concern over access to stocks during 
the June-August period. In addition to the fundamental supply and demand 
factors, the psychological element of buyers and sellers both trying to 
establish their positions in the market based on expectations also contributed 
to the higher prices. 

There was surprisingly little market reaction to the 1984/85 arrangement. 
Prices remained stable at around $1.40 for the first two months of the new 
year with much of the strength coming for the "Other Milds" coffees. New York 


9 


market prices for these coffees were kept from rising by heavy Colombian 
offerings at slightly above this level. Brazil has had to lower its price to 
large roasters in order to speed up lagging quota market sales. However, it 
was a weakness in the London Robusta market which triggered a decline in the 
15-day composite indicator price in December and a 1 -mill ion bag cut in the 
global quota on December 13th when the $1.35 per pound level was reached. 
(Table 11.) 

Cuba and Zambia Become ICO Members 


At its September 17-October 1 Council meeting the ICO approved the admission 
of Cuba as an exporting member. Cuba will have a quota of 150,000 bags for 
1984/85 and 160,000 bags for 1985/86. Cuba, which produces Arabica coffee, 
had formally requested a much larger amount, but the working group on 
accession believed the levels authorized were more nearly in line with Cuba's 
current coffee trade patterns. The bulk of Cuba's exports are expected to go 
to Spain under a bilateral trade agreement between the two countries. Cuban 
membership could eventually lead to the membership of the USSR, since the USSR 
left the ICO shortly after Cuba more than a decade ago. 

Zambia has also been provisionally accepted into the ICO as an exporting 
member exempt from basic quota. It will also be classified as an "Other Mild" 
Arabica producer with annual export quotas of 5,500 bags for 1984/85 with the 
possibility of an increase for 1985/86. 

Entry of these two countries raises exporting membership to 50 countries and 
reduces non-member production to less than one-half percent of total world 
output. 

Basket Quota 


For coffee year 1984/85 ICO importing members can receive a maximum of 441,706 
bags from non-members, down from the 507,619 bag limit applicable for 
1983/84. Imports into the United States for the current coffee year will be 
limited to 74,710 bags and must be imported from February 1 to September 30, 
1985. The United States does not plan to have a basket quota program after 
this year. The Federal Republic of Germany, Netherlands, Japan and Singapore 
will also reduce voluntarily the amount of coffee to be imported by them from 
non-members below the authorized levels for 1984/85 as shown in Table 10. 

Undershipments and Shortfalls 

In part, the high prices in 1983/84 can be attributed to undershipments during 
the year by producer members regardless of intent. To deal with this the 
Council approved new rules concerning the identification of undershipments 
along with the declaration and distribution of shortfalls. At the end of the 
second and third quarters the Executive Director of the ICO will consult with 
member countries whose shipment fall short of their entitlements to determine 
if they can meet their quota obligations. If not, the Executive Board would 
take appropriate action. Exporting members would be encouraged to declare 


10 


possible shortfalls as soon as possible. Declared shortfalls v/ould be 
redistributed to other members of the same group able to increase its exports, 
on a pro-rate basis. Countries with undeclared shortfalls at year's end would 
be penalized by quota reductions the following year. 

Tegucigalpa Group 

Producers of "Other Milds" of Latin America plus Colombia and Brazil met in 
May 1984 to form the "Tegucigalpa Group" to coordinate policy on green coffee 
sales to countries outside the ICO. At a later meeting in Mexico City 
December 3-4, 1984 they indicated a desire to raise the green coffee price to 
at least the $1.20 floor price of the ICO indicator price range. On an 
interim basis there was agreement that minimum prices for Colombian coffee 
should be 85 cents per pound f.o.b., 82 cents for "Other Milds" and 79 cents 
for Brazils. Members of the "Tegucigalpa Group" were scheduled to meet with 
officials from the major Robusta producing countries Indonesia, Ivory Coast, 
and Zaire at the ICO meeting in London in January 1985 to encourage their 
participation. 

lACO 


The Interafrican Coffee Organization (lACO) held its 24th annual meeting 
November 13-16, 1984 in Kampala, Uganda. They resolved to strengthen ties as 
a voting bloc within the ICO in order to gain increased influence over world 
coffee trade. 

ICO Executive Board 


The Executive Board of the ICO held its first regular meeting of the new year 
January 10-11, 1985, to review the market situation, operation of the quota 
system, controls on exports to non-members, stock verfications, and a number 
of other issues. 


PRODUCTION AND TRADE IN SELECTED COUNTRIES 


Costa Rica : New census data indicate that around 6,500 hectares of new coffee 

have been added in recent years with about half of the area already in 
production. Because good coffee land is limited, increased plantation density 
is also being used as a means of increasing output. In 1984/85, favorable 
weather, increased fertilizer use and improved pruning techniques more than 
offset some premature berry drop caused by the fungus disease Cercosbora 
Coffeicola. Rust is not expected to effect production in a major way, but 
labor and chemical costs are increased by the need to treat the plantations. 

The growth in Costa Pican production has not been matched by its ability to 
find markets. If Costa Rica is unable to improve on its sales volume, it will 
end 1984/85 with over 1.3 million bags of coffee stocks, up 400,000 bags from 
the preceeding September 30. 


11 


Over the last three years the general concensus has been that El Salvador's 
long-term productivity was being jeopardized by the lack of new plantings and 
poor management practices. However, National Coffee Institute (INCAFE) 
officials now report that new plantings are again occurring at levels almost 
sufficient to maintain current production levels. The larger 1984/85 crop, 
however, mainly reflects improved weather conditions. 

Preliminary data, shown below, indicate total exports increased slightly 
between 1982/83 and 1983/84. 


ICO Markets Destination 

1982/83 

1 ’ 983/84 


— 60 kilogram bags — 

United States 

972,242 

1 ,238,994 

Federal Republic of Germany.. 

685 ',526 

'774',071 

Japan 

116,002 

149,687 

Canada 


27 ',21 6 

Belgium & Other 

404,738 

74 ',238 

Non-ICO Markets 

711,492 

679, 79A 

Total 

2,890,300 

2,944,000 


Major non-ICO markets in 1983/84 were East Germany, Poland, Romania, Egypt and 
Israel . 

Total exports may decline to 2.8 million bags during 1984/85 if shipments to 
non-ICO countries cannot be maintained. 

Heavy rains that fell in late September and October did little damage to the 
Guatemal an coffee crop, most of which is grown on mountain slopes where 
drainage problems are minimal. Dense planting is now reaching down to the 
middle level and smaller producers and has permitted growers to increase 
output from the same or less area, thereby decreasing per unit production 
costs. Higher yields in combination with good coffee prices during 1984 made 
it possible for Guatemalan producers to increase their use of fertilizer as 
well as putting them in a better position to control coffee bean borer damage 
and coffee rust. 

In Honduras , rainfall and temperature patterns were generally favorable for 
the 1984/85 crop, while coffee rust and broca damage were minimized by fairly 
effective control programs financed by the Honduran Coffee Institute 
(IHCAFE). Since 1977, IHCAFE has also been involved in a project to diversify 
over 2,000 hectares of marginal coffee into the production of other crops 
including cocoa, pepper, allspice, cardamon, macadamia nuts, pineapple, 
rubber, citrus, and plantains. 


12 


Sliqhtly higher yields are now expected to boost Mexico's 1984/85 
(October/September) coffee crop 2.5 percent above last season. Although 
limited sunshine caused a delay in the maturation of the current year's 
harvest, bean size and quality are expected to be good. 

Coffee is Mexico's most important agricultural export commodity, accounting 
for 47.5 percent of the sectors foreign exchange earnings in 1983. The 2.9 
million bags Mexico exported in 1983/84 were enough to allow it to complete 
its ICO mandated quota and ship 860,000 bags to non-members market. The 
United States normally takes 60 percent or more of Mexico's exports. Hungary, 
East Germany and Czechoslovakia are the principal non-member markets. 

In Brazil , overall dehusking yields in the three major producing states of 
Parana, Sac Paulo and Minas Gerais support a production estimate for the 
country's 1984/85 (July/Oune) coffee crop of 27.0 million bags. 

Based on initial field observations the Office of the U.S. Agricultural 
Counselor in Brazil believes the 1985 (1985/86) harvest will reach 
30.0 million bags distributed by states as follows: 


States 
Parana 
Sao Paulo 
Minas Gerais 
Other 
TOTAL 


Millions of Bags 

9.0 

10.0 

4.5 

WJJ 


Despite the relatively high costs of inputs including credit, an attractive 
Government support price led growers in general to take good care of their 
coffee trees. This, in combination with overall good flowering followed by 
excellent cherry setting and the absence of significant disease or insect 
problems, are the basis for the 1985 coffee forecast. 

Attractive support and market prices are believed to have led to a small 
scale, privately financed expansion in Brazil's overall coffee tree population 
from 3.7 billion trees in 1983/84 to 3.775 billion in 1984/85 and to 3.8 
billion in 1985/86. 

During the 1983/84 coffee marketing year, Brazil exported 18.7 million bags of 
coffee including the green equivalent of 1.9 million bags as soluble coffee. 
For 1984/85 exports are projected to total 18.0 million bags. 

In 1983/84 Brazil was able to meet its ICO quota by offering bonus and special 
price discounts to its major buyers mainly the large roasters in the United 
States and Europe. Since September export sales have lagged well below quota 
levels. In an effort to make Brazil's coffee more competitive in the world 
market, the Brazilian Coffee Institute lowered its "Contribution Quota" or 
export tax by $10 per bag to $68 effective December 12, 1984. However, the 


13 


reduction was more than offset by a 10 to 15 percent rise in domestic market 
prices in anticipation of the move. The IBC subsequently negotaited sales 
contracts with major U.S. and European importers which will lower the real 
price for Brazilian coffee from $1.20 per pound in 1984 to $1.15 in 1985. 
Contracts can include a maximum 20 percent Robusta and 80 percent or more 
Arabica. The real selling price will be based on the average price between 60 
percent Central American coffee and 40 percent African Robusta, up from 35 
percent last year. The term guarantee against market price reductions of up 
to 20 cents per pound has been increased from 40 to 60 working days from 
shipment. 

Brazil has reportedly sold China 100,000 bags of coffee at a discount of $78 
per bag. An additional 12,000 bags will be delivered free-of-charge for 
promotional purposes to help develop coffee drinking among the Chinese. 

The IBC has announced the main points of the Government's 1985 coffee policy 
to be: 

1) Implement a new export quota distribution system which will likely 
increase the shares of the grower's cooperatives. 

2) Give additional support to growers now regarded as the highest risk 
sector of the Brazilian coffee industry. 

3) Operate from a position of crop surpluses rather than of shortages. 

4) Improve the efficiency of the domestic processing industry and 
increase domestic coffee consumption. 

Heavy rains and cloud cover in late October and early November in Colombia 
reportedly reduced the 1984/85 coffee harvest by up to 10 percent. Damage was 
primarily the result of bean drop although it was also expected to affect 
flowering for that portion of the bean crop harvested between April and July 
1985. 

Because institutional credit has not been available for establishing new 
plantations for several years, the area in coffee remains relatively unchanged 
at 1.01 million hectares. Yields on traditional plantations averaged close to 
450 kg per hectare in 1983/84, compared to improved plantations without shade 
at 1,550 kg/ha. Yields were up for all three sectors because weather 
conditions were generally favorable, especially during blossoming in major 
producing areas. Also fertilizer use was more extensive despite higher 
prices, and there was some improvement in tree care by growers apprehensive 
about coffee rust. At the end of September 1984, one year after first being 
discovered in Colombia, rust affects about 2.0 percent of the total coffee 
area. Crop quality was reportedly better in 1983/84 than in 1982/83 because 
more water was available on farms for the washing of coffee cherries which 
helped to reduce acidity. 

Marketing year 1983/84 exports are officially placed at nearly 9.97 million 
bags, 8.6 percent higher than a year earlier. Exports to non-ICO members at 
836,446 bags were 18 percent higher. Sales to non-ICO markets could fall 


14 


during the current year, more than offsetting any gains to markets within the 
ICO. The typical non-member agreement involves barter arrangements with 
Eastern Bloc countries especially Czechoslovakia. Most of Colombia's major 
ICO export markets are in West Europe. 

A major part of the coffee purchased by the Coffee Growers' Federation (CGF) 
but not sold is held by ALMACAFE (the CGF marketing agency). Growing stock 
levels are becoming an increasingly difficult financial burden for Colombia's 
National Coffee Fund. At the end of the current marketing year (1984/85) 
stocks are expected to total 13.6 million bags, up from 12.7 million bags at 
the end of 1983/84. All stocks currently held are believed to be of export 
quality, maintained in that condition by a rotational withdrawal system 
administered by ALMACAFE. 

Colombia plans to stabilize future production at between 12.0 and 13.0 million 
bags on the best coffee lands, and to the extent national funding is 
available, implement Project Prodesarrollo under which over 200,000 hectares 
of marginal coffee will be converted to crop, livestock, and forestry uses. 

Renovation by pruning or replacement of older less productive plantations with 
the new high yielding, rust resistant variety "Colombia" are now the major 
objectives for the main producing areas. Special lines of credit in 
increasing amounts have been opened for these activities from the Agricultural 
Financing Fund (FFAP). 

Peru's coffee exports in 1984/85 may be down somewhat from the 982,000 bags 
exported last year due to a reduction in demand from some non-member 
countries, especially Argentina. However, as a partial offset, Peru may sell 
coffee to the Soviet Union under a bilateral agreement designed to reduce its 
debt to that country provided a satisfactory arrangement can be reached on 
prices. 

Ecuador's 1984/85 (April /March) coffee crop estimate is up 12 percent from 
1983/84. Yields of both Arabica and Robusta coffees have rebounded sharply 
from the torrential rain depressed levels of the past two years. Mew coffee 
plantings are known to have occurred in the Amazon basin (Oriente Province). 
While Ecuador is known primarily for its Arabica, most of the new planting 
have been to the higher vi el ding Robustas and Robusta output now exceeds that 
of Arabica. A prohibition on exports to ICO non-members during the last two 
quarters of coffee year 1983/84 (April -September 1984) has been lifted and 
non-member shipments should increase. 

Cameroon ' s 1984/85 coffee crop got off to an excellent start under favorable 
weather conditions— well distributed rains interspersed with good periods of 
sunshine. Output could reach a record 2.1 million bags, nearly double the 
disappointing drought reduced harvest of 1983/84. Cameroon's coffee area is 
estimated at 400,000 hectares of which about 55 percent is Robusta and 
45 percent is Arabica. While coffee's area is thought to be gradually 
expanding, competition of cropland for food is a significant constraint for 
Cameroon, as it is for much of Africa. New census data, now being developed. 


15 


are expected to show substantial growth in Robusta's share. Robusta trees 
mature earlier, bear heavier, and are more profitable. The problems of 
Cameroon's overage Arabica trees are accentuated by the loss of crop area to 
urbanization and the lack of a fertilizer well adapted to the soil conditions 
in the areas where Arabicas are grown. 

Coffee production estimates for the Ivory Coast have been lowered from 5.0 to 
4.833 million bags for 1984/85 (October/September) , and from 1.92 to 1.417 
million bags for 1983/84. The drought-reduced 1983/84 harvest was catastropic 
with output down 69 percent from 1982/83. Eastern production areas suffered 
the most with losses of up to 75 percent. More favorable weather conditions, 
the up year of a two-year production cycle, and the continuing rejuvenation of 
overaged coffee trees are the main reason for the improvement expected in 
1984/85. 

The Ivory Coast nearly depleted 1983/84 carryin stocks totaling nearly 1.4 
million bags in an effort to meet its ICO quota for the year. Only an 
estimated 429,000 bag carryover of poor quality beans was available on 
October 1, 1984 against a quota of 1,090,704 bags for October/December 1984. 
Farmers were being encouraged to harvest and deliver their coffee to 
processing mills during the first quarter of the crop year rather than waiting 
until January -February so that the country could take advantage of favorable 
market prices for Robusta coffee and meet its ICO quota for the quarter. 

Crop quality dropped dramatically during 1983/84. Some cooperative groups 
overestimated the production of their members in order to obtain a larger cash 
advance for crop purchases and then were forced to make up the shortfall with 
substandard cherries. Government extension agents will now work more closely 
with the farmers to insure proper bean collection and conditioning. 

About 92 percent of Indonesia's coffee area is cultivated by small holders. 
Among the estate sector which constitutes the remaining area, 44 percent are 
state-owned and the balance private. Existing estates are mostly located in 
East Java, but some are in Central and South Sulawesi. Since the government's 
main concern is now quality rather the quantity, the planting of coffee is 
discouraged in areas where other crops could be grown. The average yield of 
coffee in Indonesia is about 500 kg/ha. Through increased tree density, 
improved cultural and harvesting practices, and the modernization of 
processing methods among small holders, the government hopes to move the 
average toward the target level of 800 kg/Ha. 

For 1984/85, Indonesia's coffee exports are expected to decline slightly 
because the Indonesian Association of Coffee Exporters (AEK) has proposed that 
Indonesia decrease its coffee exports to non-ICO countries in part to support 
coffee prices and in part to insure an adequate domestic supply. 

The United States remains Indonesia's largest coffee buyer. For the period 
January-July 1984, 39 percent of all exports were shipped to the United 
States. As of September 1, 1984, export surcharges of 1.67 percent and 3.85 
percent, respectively were placed on Arabica and Robusta bean exports. 


16 


Based on post blossom estimates, the 1984/85 (October/September) Indian coffee 
crop could reach a record 2.83 million bags, including 1.40 mill ion bags of 
Arabica and 1.43 million bags of Robusta. The cyclical biennial bearing 
tendency of the coffee tree is also responsible for the anticipated record, up 
1.16 million bags over the drought affected crop harvested in 1983/84. 

The Coffee Board, in its 7th Five Year Plan, has targeted a growth rate of 5.5 
percent per year with output at 3.0 million bags by the terminal 
year--l 989/90. In order to reach the goal, area will be expanded by 50,000 
hectares, including 20,000 hectares in traditional coffee areas and 30,000 
hectares in non-traditional areas. There are an estimated 242,000 hectares in 
coffee this year, up from 234,000 in 1983/84. 

India ' s short crop in 1983/84 marginally reduced exports, including soluble 
coffee, to 1.12 million bags versus 1.14 million bags the previous year. Due 
to the expectation of a record crop for 1984/85, exports for the year are 
forecast at 1.5 million bags. About half of the sales will be made to 
countries outside the ICO under bilateral agreements, principally the Soviet 
Union. In large measure India controls its ability to export to non-members 
by price and the level of its export duty. There are no export duties on the 
small quantity of instant coffee exported. 


C. Milton Anderson (202) 447-2252 


17 


TABLE 1 


CJFFEE, GKEBI: TOTAL PRODUCTION IN SPECIFIED COUNTRIES - AVERAGE 1975/76-1979/BO. ANNUAL 19BU/BI-19B4/85 1/ 

(IN THOUSANUS OF 60 KILO BAGS. Z/\ U 


I6I0N ANO COUNTRY : AVERAGE : ; : t I 

: 197S/76-1979/S0 t 1930/31 : 1981/82 : 1982/85 ; 1985/84 l 1984/85 


IRTH ANERlCAt 


COSTA RICA......... 

. 1*485 

2*140 

1*732 

2*500 

2*070 

2*150 


CU9A... ............ ...... 

. 519 

544 

333 

350 

580 

575 


SONtNtCAN REPUBLIC....... 

. 906 

1*112 

ISO 

1*100 

800 

900 


CL SALVADOR...... 

. 2*857 

2*940 

2*186 

5*100 

2*517 

5*000 


GUATCNALA.... 

. 7*454 

2*702 

2*833 

2*510 

2*540 

2*800 


HAITI 

. 538 

4aS 

494 

674 

680 

A2S 


HONDURAS................. 

9o9 

1*265 

1*200 

1*800 

1*950 

1*800 


JAMAICA.................. 

. 24 

20 

23 

30 

53 

40 


NIIICO 

. 5*898 

5*882 

5*900 

4*330 

4*170 

4*480 


NICARAGUA................. 

. 928 

953 

950 

1*257 

710 

1*000 


PARANA.................... 

. 92 

142 

120 

151 

143 

190 


TRINIDAD-T09 AGO.... ....... 

. 44 

48 

44 

23 

50 

50 


UNITED STATES..... 

. 188 

243 

211 

247 

195 

229 


TOTAL NOBTH ANCRICA.... 

. 14*480 

14*214 

15*494 

18*112 

15*778 

17*579 


lUTH ANCRICAs 








90LIVIA.... 

. , 120 

145 

155 

155 

150 

180 


9RAIIL.............. ...... 

. 1 a* 580 

21*300 

33*000 

17*750 

50*000 

27*000 


C0L0N8IA. 

. 10^832 

13*500 

14*542 

1 1* 500 

15*000 

12*800 


ECUADOR 

. t*C85 

1*517 

1*792 

1*800 

1*180 

1*590 


GUTANA 

. 18 

26 

26 

25 

25 

25 


PARAGUAY.. 

. 81 

150 

229 

271 

280 

500 


PERU 

. 1*053 

1*170 

1*100 

1*100 

1*270 

1*150 


VENEZUELA 

. 938 

1*109 

1*107 

791 

1*150 

1*075 


TOTAL SOUTH AMERICA.... 

. 52*588 59*097 

51*751 

35*192 

47*255 

44*058 


ERICA: 







angola. 

. 731 

55# 

592 

530 

280 

500 


3ENIN 

. 9 

38 

17 

SO 

55 

50 


aURUNDI...... 

. 355 

515 

750 

540 

595 

592 


CANCROON 

. 1*490 

1*959 

1*993 

1*929 

1*058 

2*117 


CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC. 

. 183 

277 

234 

518 

ISO 

290 


CONGO* BRAZZAVILLE....... 

. 51 

40 

18 

52 

15 

40 


eduatorial guinea........ 

. 15 

15 

20 

29 

10 

IS 


ETHIOPIA................. 

. 2*975 

5*284 

5*212 

1*870 

I* 700 

5*800 


GA90N.... .......... ...... 

. 5 

8 

15 

29 

35 

40 


GHANA.................... 

. 45 

27 

IS 

23 

25 

25 


GUINEA 

. 87 

112 

84 

85 

80 

70 


IVORY COAST 

. 4* 394 

8*090 

4*180 

4*510 

1*417 

4*853 


KENYA.................... 

. 1*424 

1*701 

1*489 

1*541 

2*093 

1*090 


LIBERIA 

. 139 

147 

185 

159 

155 

195 


PADAGASCAR....... ........ 

. 1*123 

1*150 

1*305 

1*000 

1*500 

1*200 


NALAUI................... 

. 3 

7 

10 

18 

27 

19 


NIGERIA 

. S3 

52 

52 

45 

42 

40 


RUANDA........... 

. 428 

508 

502 

577 

538 

500 


SIERRA LEONE............. 

. 142 

187 

178 

233 

180 

Its 


TANZANIA.................. 

885 

1*080 

959 

1*033 

930 

900 


TOGO 

. 139 

183 

223 

284 

275 

280 


UGANDA. ....j..... ......... 

. 2*180 

2*153 

2*883 

1*200 

5*400 

5*900 


ZAIRE (CONGO*<>.......... 

. 1*245 

1*528 

1*425 

1*554 

1*480 

1*950 


ZIN9AH.C.................. 

. 74 

98 

82 

117 

147 

180 


TOTAL AFRICA........... 

. 18*147 

21*417 

20*213 

20*878 

17*983 

21*527 


IIA: 








INDIA..................... 

. 1*924 

1*977 

2*940 

2*170 

1*870 

2*830 


INDONESIA....... 

. 4*017 

5*585 

5*783 

4*750 

5*150 

5*300 


NALATSIA 

. 154 

139 

148 

159 

185 

180 


PHILIPPINES 

. 818 

944 

1*087 

1*000 

990 

1*089 


THAILAND................. 

. 120 

201 

277 

527 

500 

529 


vietnan... ....... ........ 

. 85 

70 

»0 

80 

80 

80 


TENEN* ARAN RfP. .......... 

. 4S 

57 

59 

90 

SO 

90 


TOTAL ASIA............. 

. 8*928 

3*753 

9*932 

8*318 

$*SS5 

9*834 


lEANlA: 








NCU CALEDONIA............. 


10 

10 

10 

10 

10 


PAPUA NCU GUINEA ...., 

. 725 

853 

480 

891 

950 

1*000 


total OCEANIA.......... 

. 734 

343 

640 

901 

980 

1*010 

mmmmmmmwm 


)RLO TOTAL 


75*134 88*544 98*082 85*J«« 90*559 95*808 


CoffM*mrtart1n9lmf"l^iM «iteM Octo^n^ uii aJiHi' or July iii 'o'thtr«. y xaZ-nr^auHtt. 

ITE: ProOvctlen MtlRStofl for xo» couMrlos Inclu^ cAsi-mrOor mraaMts. 

URCE: Prsotrod or RStIrateO on tNo Bools of official statistics of forolgn govomsants, otNor forol^i soorco oatorlals, roports of U.S. Agricultural 
itachas anO Forolgn Sorvleo Officors, results of offleo rrssasxN, and rolatod InfOnsstlon. 

>"***nr ISSS Forolgn Production Estlnatos 01 vision, FAS/USUA 


18 


TABLE 2 


COfFEE. GHEEN: EXPORTABLE PROOUCTIOH IN SPECIFIED COUNTRIES - AVERAGE 1975/76-1979/80. ANNUAL 1980/81- 19M/85 

(IN THOUSANUS OF 60 KILU BAGS. Zj\ 


TEStON auo C0UNT4T 

: AVERAGE : 

; 197S/76-1R79/10 : 

1*80/81 

: t 

z 19S1/92 : 

1932/31 i 

1983/84 

1994/89 

iONTH *<tEFIC«t 

COST* TICA. ............. 

.. 1*772 

1*912 

1*139 

2*077 

1*817 

2*113 

C'JsA 

• • •• 

mm 

•— 

•• 

mm 

mm 

OO’ttNICA't Ac«U4L:C...... 

.. All 

622 

535 

900 

498 

995 

€L SALVADOR 

.. 2*047 

2*740 

2*486 

2*9C0 

2*117 

2*800 

CUATE1ALA. .............. 

.. 2*131 

2*161 

2*128 

2*199 

2*000 

2*240 

HA ITt..... ....... ....... 

.. 129 

240 

264 

434 

419 

173 

HOHOURAS.. ....... ....... 

.. 342 

1*149 

1*080 

1*676 

1*422 

1*448 

JANAtC A...... ........... 

.. 13 

3 

11 

18 

21 

27 

HfttCO.......... 

.. 2* 10* 

2*162 

2*430 

2*930 

2*470 

2*780 

NIC A* ASU A. .............. 

.. 646 

S4* 

833 

1*157 

610 

900 

RAN AH A. ....... .......... 

.. 26 

77 

34 

93 

74 

82 

TAtNIDAD-TOa AGO... ...... 

.. 10 

24 

26 

1 

10 

9 

UNITED STATES........... 

• • 


•• 

•• 

•• 

— 

total NORTH ANERTCA... 

.. 11*10* 

12*164 

11*948 

14*173 

11*874 

11*411 



ummmmmmmmmmmwunmmmMmmmmmmmmm»ummmm9 


1 

■ 

1 

1 

south ANSPICAt 

BOLIVIA 

.. 3* 

111 

100 

11* 

113 

121 

RAA21L. 

.. 1 0* S40 

13*100 

24*300 

9*750 

21*300 

18*100 

COLONHIA, ............... 

.. 9*266 

11*673 

12*492 

11*443 

11*140 

10*911 

ECUADOR 

.. 1*273 

1*2*7 

1*362 

1*560 

1*133 

1*290 

SUT AN A........... ....... 

mm 

1 

1 

3 

3 

1 

RARAGU AT..... ........... 

.. 60 

106 

207 

249 

237 

277 

REHU 

.. 303 

*2* 

642 

640 

1*043 

•40 

VENEZUELA............... 

.. 164 

1* 

31 

— 

223 

71 

total SOUTH ANERICA... 

.. 22*238 

27*642 3**787 

23*969 

13*420 

12*141 

AFRtCAj 

ANGOLA.................. 

.. 712 

343 

130 

287 

214 

293 

^cNtN.... ........ ....... 

.. R 

IS 

16 

49 

34 

49 

dURUNOl... .............. 

.. 134 

114 

72* 

137 

392 

191 

CA.NEROON... ...... ....... 

.. 1*462 

1*926 

1*915 

1*904 

1*012 

2*092 

central AERICRN REPUHLIC 

.. 134 

260 

26* 

2*8 

117 

231 

CONGO* >raz:aville...... 

.. SO 

19 

33 

11 

34 

19 

EOUATORZAL guinea 

.. 1 

mm 

•» 

1 

IS 

20 

ETHtORIA................ 

.. 1*2P0 

1*644 

1*3*6 

2*040 

2*030 

1*919 

GAION 

• • 4 

7 

14 

28 

14 

39 


.. 14 

23 

31 

18 

20 

20 

GUINEA.................. 

.. 6l 

104 

18 

3* 

14 

44 

IVORT COAST............. 

.. 4*112 

4*024 

4*093 

4*445 

1*132 

4*741 

RENTA................... 

.. 1*177 


1*4J4 

1*301 

2*049 

1*000 

Lt>E At A.. ....... ........ 

.. 113 

141 

13* 

133 

129 

144 

aaoasascar.... .......... 

.. RA2 

984 

1*112 

821 

1*120 

1*017 

•ALAWt 

.. 1 

2 

10 

16 

27 

33 

NIGERIA 

• • 


— 

• - 

— 

•• 


.. <.26 

104 

>00 

174 

313 

499 

SIERRA LEONE............ 

.. 117 

142 

1/1 

229 

174 

179 

TANZANIA................ 

.. 822 

1*041 

*3* 

1*011 

930 

880 

TOGO 

.. 136 

1*4 

224 

281 

274 

279 

UGANDA .................. 

.. 2*143 

2*0*0 

2*840 

1*134 

1*151 

1*452 

ZAIRE <C9NG0*O. ........ 

.. 1*090 

1*344 

1*240 

1*169 

1*293 

1*190 

ZINNAIUE................ 

.. 63 

83 

72 

107 

139 

171 

total arnica... 

.. 13*764 

19*0*7 

17*849 

18*324 

19*419 

18*912 

ASlAt 

INDIA................... 

.. 1*0*1 

1*090 

t«39* 

1*147 

498 

1*830 

INOONESIA.... 

.. 2**81 

4*137 

4*610 

1*434 

4*010 

4*100 

HALATSIA 

.. 12 

•• 

•• 

— 


MN 

RH|LXR*INES..... 

.. 171 

312 

572 

400 

118 

410 

THAILAND................ 

.. 21 

83 

191 

191 

199 

ISO 

VISTNAN.... ...... ....... 

.. 12 

33 

23 

29 

29 

23 

TENEN* ARAN REP......... 

.. 38 

47 

4S 

40 

40 

40 

TOTAL ASIA............ 

.» 4*44* 

5*904 

7*022 

3*499 

9*230 

4*589 

OCEANIAi 

HER CALEDONIA... 







mm 


.. 712 

937 

664 

374 

•31 

983 

TOTAL OCEANIA......... 

.. 712 

■••••••••••••••••••••••I 

«57 

■•••a 

664 

874 4S5 

r— a a—iwai 

983 


rfORLO TOTAL.. 54.271 4««0*4 77*170 •ZaPNT 49*0«4 72*032 

y CoffM ■rfcatlnq :^r btoint sbout Octobar In tarn csuRtrlM wid Abril or July In otiMrt. ExportabU productloN rtprusoNU total harvaatao productloH 
Nlmis astiNBtad doMtlc coNiunptlaR. y IS. 276 poiMNt. 

NOTE: ProtetloN attlaatas for soaa couatrlw Includo cross-borOor aovoMots. 

SOURCE: PraparNd or astlaatad on tha baals of official sUtlstIct of foraloa goiiir—Nti. otbar foralga sourca aataHal. raporu of b.S. Agricultural 
Attachaa aad Foralga Sarvica Officara, raaults of off lea raaaareh. aad ralatai iNfbraatloN. 

JiNuary 1985 Horticultural aad Tropical Producta Ulvlaloa. FaS/bSuA 


19 


JO^IO COFFFE SUPPLY AND D I S T P I 3 U T I ON 1 ')6 1 -1 P 3 


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20 


HORTICULTUPAL 'AND TROPICAL PRODUCTS DIVISION 

DECEM3ER 1934 COMMODITY PROGRAMS/ FAS/ USDA 


TABLE 4 


WORLD COFFEE SUPPLY AND DISTRUBUTION, 1984/flS V 
(In Thousands of 60 Kg Bags) 


Country 

: Beginning 

: Stocks 

Production 

Imports : 

Total 

S/D 

Exports 

Domestic 
: Use 

Ending 

Stocks 

Costa Rica.... 

. . . : 901 

2,350 


3,251 

1,762 

235 

1,254 



375 

275 

650 

'250 

400 



. . . : 660 

900 


1 ,560 

600 

305 

655 


...: 1,475 

3,000 

2,600 


41475 

2,770 

200 

1,505 


...: 910 


3,510 

2,300 

340 

P70 

Haiti 

...: 40 

'625 

... 

’665 

400 

250 

15 


...: 1,181 

1,600 

• •• 

2,781 

1,200 

13? 

1 .449 


...: 10 

40 

2 

■ 52 

30 

13 

9 


...: 1,015 

4,480 

1,000 


5,495 

3,100 

1,700 

695 


, . . : 40 

... 

li040 

850 

100 

90 


...: 35 

150 



185 

65 

68 

52 


...: 7 

30 

4 

41 

13 

21 

7 


...: 101 

229 

90 

420 



300 

120 





6,375 

17,379 

371 

24,125 

13,340 

4,064 

6,721 




...: 37 

160 


187 

120 

37 

30 


...: 8,714 

27,000 



35,714 

18,000 

10,000 

8,500 

9,214 


...: 12;686 

12;800 



25,486 

1 ,B65 

13,621 

Ecuador 

...: '765 

1,550 

... 

2;315 

1,480 

260 

'575 



25 



25 

3 

7? 



Para<fuav 

...: 187 

300 

... 

487 

200 

73 

264 

Pftni 

. . . : 530 

1,150 



1,680 

950 

210 

520 


. . , : 301 

i;073 



i;374 

no 

1,000 

264 







Total 

...: 23,210 

44,058 


67,268 

30,863 

11,917 

74,488 







Angola,**..... 

. . . : 843 

300 


1,143 

400 

45 

698 

R#n1n..'. 


50 

... 

50 

49 

1 

... 

Burundi 

....: 220 

392 


612 

470 

1 

141 


....: 908 

2,117 

250 

1 

3,026 

255 

1,750 

25 

1,751 

Cent. Af. Rep. 

: 5 


234 

15 

6 

Congo 

: 5 

40 


45 

37 

1 

7 

Eguat. Guinea* 


35 

• •• 

35 

20 

15 

... 

Ethiopia 

2,334 

3,600 

40 

... 

5,934 

1.650 

1,665 

7,619 

Gabon 




40 

39 

1 

... 

Ghana 

. . . . : 40 

25 

... 

65 

25 

5 

35 

Guinea 

45 

70 



115 

68 

6 

41 

Ivory Coast. . . 

: 429 

4,833 
1 ,050 

... 

5,262 

4,484 

70 

708 

Kenva 

,...: 1,402 



2,452 

1.533 

50 

869 

Liberia 

: ■ 40 

155 

5 

200 

150 

7 

43 

Hadaoascar. . . . 

: 879 

1,200 

... 

7,079 

970 

183 

976 

Malawi 

....: 7 

35 

... 

42 

26 

... 

16 


: 25 

40 

127 

192 

35 

135 

72 


; 70 

500 

... 

570 

500 

1 

69 

Sierra Leone., 

: 1 

185 

... 

186 

175 

6 


Tanzania 


900 


1,417 

060 

70 

447 

TOQO 

I.::; 25 

280 

3,500 


■305 

7,306 

P,620 

223 

775 

7,700 

1,150 

136 


ib 

Uganda 

3,806 


48 

700 

9 

4,668 

1,770 

78 

Zaire 

. : 1 ,070 

1,550 

180 


Zimbabwe 

....: 43 





Total 

...: 12,714 

21,327 

133 

34,174 

17,826 

7,510 


India 


1 %r ^ w 

. . . : 

J,83fl 

5,300 

180 

1,089 

325 

60 

50 


3,356 

6,887 

380 

1,619 

429 

60 

50 

1,SW 

4,000 

80 

410 

160 

25 

40 

” V,flM 
1,200 
255 
679 
145 
35 
10 


Indonesia 

1,587 


1 ,687 
46 
530 
124 

Malaysia 

... : ’40 

160 

Phlllippines.. 

. . . : 530 

Thailand 

...: 101 

3 

Vietnam 


Yemen Arab Rep 


— 

... 

Total 

2,784 

9,834 

163 

12,781 

6,715 

3,324 

3,742 



New Caledonia. 


10 

1,000 


10 

1,187 


10 

17 


Papua>N Guinea 

...: 187 

— 

996 

174 

Total 

187 

1,010 


1,197 

996 

77 

174 




WORLD TOTAL... 

...: 45,270 

93,608 

667 

139,545 

69,240 

21,842 

48,463 



y Forecast. 

Coffee marketing year begins about October In some 

countries 

and April or 

July In others. 



January 1985 


Horticultural and Tropical Products nivlslon, FAS/USPA 

21 


TABLE 5 


U.S. ItVCRlS or ccms BI TXPBS and COPPBS years (OCnSat/SBPTBeER) 1982/83 AW 1983/84 
(In 60 KUograa Bagsr Gimh aaan Bquivnlant) 



1985781 

155375? 


Groan 

: Roastad/ 
Ground 

: Solubla 1/ 

Total 

Glean 

: Roaatad/ 
Ground 

: solubla ^ 

Total 

COLOmiAN MILD8 

mlni^4ji , 

1,797,797 

17,320 

11 

56,736 

1,871,853 

313,496 

15,449 

2,U7,181 

193,068 

9,717 

80 

63,269 

28180^530 

Kflnya. .......... 

313^485 

5 

TimcMi^a 

15,443 

6 




433 

10,150 





•••••••••••• 

2,126,725 

17,337 

56,736 

2,200,798 

2,319,966 

85 

63,702 

2,383,753 

oran NiiDS 
Hunpidi 

93r38€ 



93,386 

243,841 

432,160 

925,177 

1,188,338 

8U,907 

154,948 

194,257 

195,325 

U,446 

296,519 

468,545 

1,002,356 

1,185,720 

1,069,818 

U8,464 

328,945 

170,467 

ana 

1,693,243 

2,563 

53,971 



11 116 

Rtca 

213)676 

431,855 

8U,348 

1,166,085 

809,272 

154,948 

194,257 

195,325 

996 

30,165 

305 

396 



10,218 

947 

165 

90 

884 


306,737 

470,517 

1,096,796 

1,204,174 

1,071,180 

U8,464 

329,026 

Ooninican Rspubllc.. 
Ecuador............. 

113,433 

U,434 

1,294 

1,025 

94,275 

18,364 

478 

Bl Salvador 

SuatoMla. .......... 

819 

2,341 

Haiti 

HnnAirM. 




81 

2,168 

377 

179,392 


India............... 




172,635 

1,199 

1,876,080 

2,571 

53,971 

63,U2 

544,683 

96,312 

89,355 

24,000 

Janaica ............ . 

669 

32 

l)697 

1,549,476 

19,086 

46,356 

43,378 

459,602 

207,307 

11,406 

471 

27,211 

14 

3,445 

8 

Harioo. ............ . 

1,414,860 

5,873 

46,356 

43,378 

454,754 

207,307 

U,406 

471 

27,2U 

124,528 

7 

10,088 

13,206 



p«" ■■■ ..... 



Papua NSW Gulnaa.... 

Pmru« ....... a. ^ a. ^ 

1,036 

3,8U 

63)112 

544,419 

94,363 

86,078 

24,000 


264 

THm0»Am . 


1,949 

vwMSuala. ......... . 


. 

3,277 

Yaaan Arab Rapublic. 

— 

— 








6,282,764 

160,266 

163,299 

6,606,329 

7,214,837 

197,599 

U9,822 

7,532,258 



UNWVSaED ARABICAS 

Rolf Vi A 

18,193 

3,593,344 

552,113 

108,688 



18,193 

4,488,353 

552,113 

108,688 

3,975 



3,975 

4,522,307 

418,342 

SCAXXX* aabsaabababaa 

RfehinpiA 

25,161 

869,848 

3,623,504 

418,082 

152,802 

58,530 

840,273 

260 

DAPAf^tAy 




152,802 






Total 

4,272,338 

25,161 

869,848 

5,167,347 

4,198,363 

58,530 

840,533 

5,097,426 


poaasns 

73,562 

179,015 

7,560 

23,204 

1,096,435 

613,043 

35,529 

155,350 

30,255 



73,562 

179,015 

7,560 

23,204 

1,101,445 

613,097 

35,529 

155,355 

30,255 

4,992 

66,165 

28,8U 

1,147,633 

1,205,509 

22,775 

82,802 

6,622 

4,603 

241,722 



4,992 

66,180 

28,811 

1,149,470 

1,205,509 

22,775 

82,802 

6,622 



Canaroon ........... . 





15 


Cantral Afr. Rap.... 

— 

— 


Indonasia 

Tunry 

5,010 

54 

1,837 


f<-i*’prta. 




HAdtAIJAArvAir 

5 





Malarais 





Nigaria 





Phi 1 

335,132 

96,687 

22,266 

103,359 

141,536 

10,904 

1,055,016 

38,224 

1,222 



336,354 

96,687 

22,266 

103,375 

141,536 

10,904 

1,055,016 

38,229 

1,309 


243,031 

190,553 

17,634 

94,042 

188,340 

4,035 

643,522 

Siorra Leona........ 



190)553 

17,634 

94,036 

188,340 


Sri TAnlcA 





'Tt\*i ImvI 

2 

14 

6 


Togo ------ 




Trinidad & Tobago* «• 
ogmla 

— 

— 

4,035 

643,522 



2alr* 

5 

■ ■ -- 

9,559 

29 


9,588 






4,017,077 

6,244 

68 

4,023,389 

3,959,313 

3,196 


3,962,509 





cmat cooHiRiBS 3/.... 

394,582 

13,343 

66,009 

473,934 

430,694 

16,667 

66,814 

514,175 

WRU) TOTAL. 

17,093,486 

222,351 

1,155,960 

18,471,797 

18,123,173 

276,077 

1,090,871 19,490,121 

1/ convoraion rata i ib* 80ltibl«*3 IM* graaPa 
non-firoducing oountriaa in waatarn Buropa* 

^ convaraion rata i lb. soiubia-2.6 ib*. graon. 3/ nainiy 


SOQRCS: OBDA 


January 198S 


22 


Horticultural and Tropical Products Division, PAS/OSDA 


TABLE 6 


SHARE IN INITIAL ANNUAL QUOTA OF EXPORTING MEMBERS 
ENTITLED TO A BASIC QUOTA AND EXEMPT FROM BASIC QUOTAS 

COFFEE YEARS 1984/85 AND 1985/86 


Exporting Member 
entitled to a basic quota 

Share of 
annual quota 

Exporting Member 
exempt from basic quotas 

Share of 
annual quota 


(1) 


(i) 

TOTAL (with Angola) 


TOTAL 

100.00 

TOTAL (without Angola) 

100.00 

Members other than OAMCAF 

70.96 

Coloatbian Milds 

19.94 

Sub-total: Members exporting 




100 000 bags or less (without OAMCAF) 

21.13 

Colombia 

16.13 



Kenya 

2.46 

Equatorial Guinea 

0.84 



Ghana 

2.11 

Tanzania 

1.35 





Jamaica 

1.05 

Other Milds 

23.16 

Malawi 

0.98 

Costa Rica 

2.14 

Nigeria 

3.07 



Panama 

2.76 

Dominican Republic 

0.94 





Sri Lanka 

2.26 

Ecuador 

2.15 





Trinidad and Tobago 

1.43 

El Salvador 

4.44 





Venezuela 

3.36 

Guatemala 

3.44 





Zimbabwe 

3.27 

Honduras 

1.48 



India 

1.23 

Sub-total: Members exporting 


Mexico 

3.62 

more than 100 000 bags (without OAMCAF) 

49.83 

Nicaragua 

1.27 

Bolivia 

4.60 

Papua New Guinea 

1.15 

Guinea 

4.20 

Peru 

1.30 

Haiti 

16.79 



Liberia 

5.46 

Brazilian and Other Arabicas 

33.15 

Paraguay 

4.56 

Brazil 

30.55 

Sierra Leone 

9.83 

Ethiopia 

2.60 

Thailand 

4.39 

Robustas 

23.75 

OAMC/^ 

29.04 

Indonesia 

4.51 

(a) Members exporting 




100 000 bags or less 

5.57 

OAMCAF 

(11.85) 



Cameroon 

2.71 

Benin 

2.21 

Ivory Coast 

7.68 

Congo 

1.68 

Madagascar 

1.46 

Gabon 

1.68 

Philippines 

0.89 

(b) Members exporting 


Uganda 

4.40 

more than 100 000 bags 

23.47 

Zaire 

2.10 

Central African Republic 

11.19 

Angola 


Togo 

12.28 


Burundi and Rwanda 

Burundi 

Rwanda 


23 


Statistics on Coffae 
International Coffee Organization 


TABLE 7 


COrm TEAS 1984/85 

EXPORTING MEMBERS ENTITLED TO A BASIC QUOTA 
INITIAL ANNUAL QUOTA PLUS TWO INCREASES 


(60 kilo bags) 


Exporting Hanbar 

Share of 
annual quota 
aa approved by 
Resolution 
No. 335 
( percent ) 

Amount 

corresponding 
to share 
in col.(l) 

Special 
allocations 
(Resolution 
No. 335) 

Initial 
annual quota 
col.(2)*(3) 

Two increases 
in quota 
of 1 m. bags 
each 

distributed 
on basis of 
col.(l) 

Initial 
annual quota 
plus increases 
col.(4)+(5) 


(1) 

(2) 

(J) 

<45 

(55 

(65 

TOTAL (with Angola) 


55 187 500 

305 000 

55 492 500 

2 000 000 

57 492 500 

TOTAL (without Angola) 

100.00 

54 807 500 

305 000 

55 112 500 

2 000 000 1/ 

57 112 500 

Colombian Hilda 

19.94 

10 928 615 


10 928 615 

398 800 

11 327 415 

Colombia 

16.13 

8 840 450 


8 840 450 

322 600 

9 163 050 

Kenya 

2.46 

1 348 264 


1 348 264 

49 200 

1 397 464 

Tanzania 

1.35 

739 901 


739 901 

27 000 

766 901 

Ocher Hilda 

23.16 

12 693 417 

130 000 

12 823 417 

463 200 

13 286 617 

Costa Rica 

2.14 

1 172 881 

45 000 

1 217 881 

42 800 

1 260 681 

Dominican Republic 

0.94 

515 190 


515 190 

18 800 

533 990 

Ecuador 

2.15 

1 178 361 


1 173 361 

43 000 

1 221 361 

El Salvador 

4.44 

2 433 453 


2 433 453 

88 800 

2 522 253 

Guatemala 

3.44 

1 885 378 


1 885 378 

68 800 

1 954 178 

Honduraa 

1.48 

811 151 

45 000 

856 151 

29 600 

885 751 

India 

1.23 

674 132 

25 000 

699 132 

24 600 

723 732 

Mexico 

3.62 

1 984 032 


1 984 032 

72 400 

2 056 432 

Nicaragua 

1.27 

696 055 


696 055 

25 400 

721 455 

Papua New Guinea 

1.15 

630 286 

15 000 

645 286 

23 000 

668 286 

Peru 

1.30 

712 498 


712 498 

26 000 

738 498 

Brazilian and Other Arabicas 

33.15 

18 168 686 

25 000 

18 193 686 

663 000 

18 856 686 

Brazil 

30.55 

16 743 691 


16 743 691 

611 000 

17 354 691 

Ethiopia 

2.60 

1 424 995 

25 000 

1 449 995 

52 000 

1 501 995 

Robuscas 1/ 

23.75 

13 016 782 

150 000 

13 166 782 

475 000 

13 641 782 

Indonesia 

4.51 

2 471 818 

25 000 

2 496 818 

90 200 

2 587 018 

OAMCAF 

(11.85) 

(6 494 689) 


(6 494 689) 

(237 000) 

(6 731 689) 

Cameroon 

2.71 

1 485 283 


1 485 283 

54 200 

1 539 483 

Ivory Coast 

7.68 

4 209 216 


4 209 216 

153 600 

4 362 816 

Madagascar 

1.46 

800 190 


800 190 

29 200 

829 390 

Philippines 

0.89 

487 737 


487 787 

17 800 

505 587 

Uganda 

4.40 

2 411 530 

100 000 

2 511 530 

88 000 

2 599 530 

Zaire 

2.10 

1 150 958 

25 000 

1 175 958 

42 000 

1 217 958 

Angola 


380 000 


380 000 


380 000 


y Excludaa Angola which ia ooc subject Co incroaaaa and roducciotis 


24 


Statiitics on Coffee 
International Coffee Organization 


TABLE 8 


COFFEE YEAR 1984/85 

INITIAL ANNUAL Q.UOTA PLUS ONE INCREASE AND QUARTERLY Q.UQTAS 

- in bags of 60 kilos - 

Initial annual 

quota plus one Quarterly Quotas 


Export ina Member 

increase of one Oct. /Dec. 
million bags 1984 1/ 

Jan, -Mar. 
1985 

Apr. -June 
1985 

July -Sept. 
1985 

TOTAL 

60. 000. 000 

16. 152. 248 

14. 223. 856 

14. 864. 295 


864. 303 

Sub-total: Members 

entitled to a basic quota 

57. 220. 678 

15.352,717 

13. 529, 023 

14, 169, 466 


169. 472 

Colombian Milds 

11. 128, 015 

2.931.553 
2, 371,412 

2. 732. 154 

2. 732. 153 

2.732. 155 

Colombia 

9, 001, 750 

2, 210, 113 

2, 210, 112 

2, 

210, 113 

Kenya 

1, 372, 864 

361, 666 

337, 066 

337, 066 


337, 066 

Tanzania 

753, 401 

198, 475 

184, 975 

184, 975 


184, 976 

Other Milds 

13. 055. 017 
1, 239, 281 

3. 437, 452 

3, 205. 856 
304, 470 

3, 205. 852 

3, 

205. 857 

Costa Rica 

325, 870 

304, 470 


304, 471 

Dominican Rep. 

524, 590 

138, 197 

128, 798 

128, 797 


128, 798 

Ecuador 

1, 199, 861 

316,090 

294, 590 

294, 590 


294, 591 

El Salvador 

2, 477, 853 

652, 763 

608, 363 

608, 363 


608, 364 

Guatemala 

1,919, 778 

505, 744 

471, 345 

471, 344 


471, 345 

Honduras 

870, 951 

228, 838 

214, 038 

214, 038 


214, 037 

India 

711,432 

187, 083 

174,783 

174, 783 


174, 783 

Mexico 

2, 020, 232 

532, 208 

496, 008 

496, 008 


496, 008 

Nicaragua 

708, 755 

186,714 

174, 014 

174, 014 


174, 013 

Papua New Guinea 

656,786 

172, 821 

161,322 

161,321 


161,322 

Peru 

725, 498 

191, 124 

178, 125 

178, 124 


178, 125 

ErazH. & oth. Arabicas 

18. 525. 186 

4. 879. 922 
4, 491, 423 

4. 548. 422 

4. 548. 422 

4, 

548. 420 

Brazil 

17, 049, 191 

4, 185, 923 

4, 185, 923 

4, 

185, 922 

Ethiopia 

1, 475, 995 

388, 499 

362, 499 

362, 499 


362, 498 

Robustas 

14. 512. 460 
380,000 

4. 103. 790 
95, 000 

3, 042. 591 
95, 000 

3.683,039 
95, 000 

3r 

683, 040 

Angola 


95, 000 

Indonesia 

2, 541, 918 

860, 356 

388, 053 

646,754 


646,755 

OAMCAF 

7, 341, 367 

1, 746, 467 

1, 864, 967 

1, 864, 967 

1, 

864, 966 

Philippines 

496, 687 

130, 847 

121, 947 

121, 947 


121, 946 

Uganda 

2, 555, 530 

865, 835 

389, 930 

649, 882 


649, 883 

Zaire 

1,196,958 

405, 285 

182, 694 

304, 489 


304, 490 

Sub-total: Members 
exempt from basic quotas 

2.779,322 

799. 531 

694. 833 

694, 829 


694, 831 


Note: !_/ Includes one increase of 1. 0 million bags. 


25 


TABLE 9 


COFTEE YEAR 1984/85 

EXPORTING MEMBERS EXEMPT FROM BASIC QUOTAS 
INITIAL ANNUAL QUOTA 

(60 kilo bags) 


Special 



Share of 


allocations 

Initial 


annual quota 1/ 

Amount of 

(Resolution 

annual quota 

Exporting Member 

(percent) 

annual quota 

No. 335) 

col(2)+(3) 


' (i) 

(2) 

(3) 

un 


INITIAL ANNUAL QUOTA 


TOTAL - including Burundi and Rwanda 


3 

447 

500 


60 000 

3 

507 

500 

TOTAL - excluding Burundi and Rwanda 
4.25 percent of global annual 
quota of 59 million bags 

100.00 

2 

507 

500 


60 000 

2 

567 

500 

Members other Chan OAMCAF 

70.96 

1 

779 

322 


60 000 

1 

839 

322 

Sub-total: Members exporting 

100 000 bags or less (without OAMCAF) 

21.13 


529 

835 


40 000 


569 

835 

Equatorial Guinea (R) 

0.84 


21 

063 




21 

063 

Ghana (R) 

2.11 


52 

908 




52 

908 

Jamaica (A) 

1.05 


26 

329 




26 

329 

Malawi (A) 

0.98 


24 

574 




24 

574 

Nigeria (R) 

3.07 


76 

980 




76 

980 

Panama (A) 

2.76 


69 

207 


10 000 


79 

207 

Sri Lanka (R) 

2.26 


56 

670 


10 000 


66 

670 

Trinidad and Tobago (R) 

1.43 


35 

857 




35 

857 

Venezuela (A) 

3.36 


84 

252 


10 000 


94 

252 

Zimbabwe (A) 

3.27 


81 

995 


10 000 


91 

995 

Sub-total: Members exporting 

more than 100 000 bags (without OAMCAF) 

49.83 

1 

249 

487 


20 000 

1 

269 

487 

Bolivia (A) 

4.60 


115 

345 




115 

345 

Guinea (R) 

4.20 


105 

315 




105 

315 

Haiti (A) 

16.79 


421 

009 




421 

009 

Liberia (R) 

5.46 


136 

910 




136 

910 

Paraguay (A) 

4.56 


114 

342 


10 000 


124 

342 

Sierra Leone (R) 

9.83 


246 

487 




246 

487 

Thailand (R) 

4.39 


110 

079 


10 000 


120 

079 

OAMCAF (R) 

29.04 


728 

178 




728 

178 

(a) Members exporting 

100 000 bags or less 

5.57 


139 

668 




139 

668 

Benin 

2.21 


55 

416 




55 

416 

Congo 

1.68 


42 

126 




42 

126 

Gabon 

1.68 


42 

126 




42 

126 

(b) Members exporting 

more than 100 000 bags 

23.47 


588 

510 




588 

510 

Central African Republic 

11.19 


280 

589 




280 

589 

Togo 

12.28 


307 

921 




307 

921 

Burundi and Rwanda (A) 



940 

000 




940 

000 

Burundi 



470 

000 

If 



470 

000 

Rwanda 



470 

000 

2/ 



470 

000 


Percentages in Annex 2 of Che Agreement adjusted for Equatorial Guinea and Jamaica. 
See Resolution number 335 and Annex Table 1 
2/ See sub-paragraph (a) of paragraph (6) of Article 31 of the AgrecsMnt 


A ” Arabics R “ Robusca 


26 


Statistics on Coffee 
International Coffee Organization 


TABLE 10 


LIMITATION ON IMPORTS BY IMPORTING MEMBERS FROM MON-MEMBERS 
COFFEE YEAR 1984/85 


Importl nq Member 

Average 

Imports 

1980/81-1982/83 

Non-member Import 
limitation 
1983/84 

Maximum limits : 

to be applied : 

1984/85 : 

Adjusted Import 
limitation 
1984/85 4/ 

TOTSE 

4W "OT9 ” 

507,619 

441 .706 

“ 429,053 

U.S.A. 

74,710 

109.150 

74,710 

74,710 

E.E.C. 

143,800 

122,854 

115,838 

113,441 

6e1 O'! um/Luxembourg 

48,165 

23,027 

23,027 (L) 

23,027 

Denmark 

18,182 

18,566 

18,182 (A) 

18,18? 

France 

9,996 

11,405 

9,996 (A) 

8,996 

Germany, F.R. of 

7,009 

5,990 

5,990 (L) 

4,884 

Greece 

1,587 1/ 

1,661* 

1,611 (D* 

1,611 

Ireland 

648 ~ 

747* 

747 (D* 

747 

Italy 

39,505 

44,728 

39,505 (A) 

39,505 

Netherlands 

14,997 

12,908 

12,908 (L) 

11,617 

United Kingdom 

4,241 

3,872 

3,872 (L) 

3,872 

Other Members 

236,099 

275.615 

251.158 

240,90? 

Australia 

1,652 

1,652* 

1 ,652 (D* 


Austria 

4,504 

4,654 

4,504 (A) 

4,504 

Canada 

1,473 

1,805* 

1,805 (D* 

1,805 

Cyprus 

0 

148* 

148 (D* 

148 

Fiji 

0 2/ 

4* 

4 (D* 

4 

Finland 

3,236 

2,770 

2,770 (L) 

2,770 

Japan. 

23,024 

24,933 

23,024 (A) 

22,440 

New Zealand 

444 

576* 

576 ID* 

576 

Norway 

7,269 

7,717 

7,269 (A) 

7,269 

Portugal 

9,891 

9,932 

9,891 (A) 

9,891 

Singapore 

96,732 1/ 

98.641 

96,732 

87,060 

Spain 

86,647 ~ 

79,578 3/ 

79,578 (L) 

79,578 

Sweden 

122 

240 ~ 

240 (D* 

240 

Swi tzerl and 

18,064 

16,060 

16,060 (L) 

16,060 

Yugoslavia 

15,283 

6,905 

6,905 (L) 

6., 905 


*Thls latest decis'lon does not automatically apply to importing members whose current annual non-member 
Import limitation Is less than 2,000 bags. 1/ 1981/82 and 1982/83 only. 2/ No data for 1980/81 to 
1982/83. 3/ Adjusted for the accession of Tquatorlal Guinea. (A) LImItaTlon determined by average 

Imports 1910/81 to 1982/83. (L) Limitation determined by 1983/84 Import limitation. 4/ After voluntary 

reductions. 

SOURCE: International Coffee Organization 

January 1985 Horticultural and Tropical Products Division, FAS/USDA 


27 


1984 ICO COMPOSITE INDICATOR PRICE (1979 ARREEMEMT) 
(U.S. CENTS PER POUND EQUIVALENT) 


TABLE 11 





o 

CV CO 



^ CM 

VC If 


if.if. 

^co 

or 



o. 

coif. 


o 

CM 



1 1 

VC CO 

a If. 

^ 1 

1 vr 

c^.c 

r*^if. 

1 1 

COP- 

oo 

oc 

1 

1 1 

1 oc 

OCC^ 

1 1 

VC 

c 


u 

1 1 



• 1 

1 • 



1 1 




1 

1 1 

1 • 


1 1 




a; 

1 1 

r*-r^ 

VC VC 

VC 1 

1 if. 

if. ID 


1 1 


^ CO 

CO 

1 

1 • 

• CO 

coco 

1 1 


if. 


Ci 


coco 

CO CO 

CO 

CO 

coco 

CO C'-. 


coco 

coco 

CO 



CO 

coco 


r". 

CO 




. 





' 


'"" 





■“ 

' ^ 






«Q-ro 


i^ir 

CM ID 


CM 

ID CO 

r— CO 


CMf— 

r- 



VC 


r-o 


CM 


• 

co^ 

1 1 

If. 

o.#— 

CO 1 

1 VC 

O CM 

LDCv 

1 1 

Of— 


1 

^ 1 

1 ^ 

ooc 

^p 


c 


> 


1 1 



• 1 

1 • 



1 1 



1 




• • 




o 

VC VC 

1 1 

O' VC 

VO 

1 

1 

f^OC 

ococ 

1 1 

oco. 

o> 

1 

O 1 

1 3. 

3.00 

ococ 


oc 


A 

coco 


coco 

CO c^. 

CO 

CO 

CO CO 

coco 


coco 

CO 


CO 

CO 

coco 

coco 


CO 





r— ^ 


















CVJVC 

ccc^ 

c 

CM 

ID o 

r^CM 


1^3. 

ooo 



K 

Lf.^ 

cor^ 


ooo 


CO 


• 

a.ro 

oc^ 

O 1 

1 VC 

CM Cl 

ID CO 

1 1 

occ 

00 oc 

1 

1 oc 

3C 

oo 

1 1 

t !■ 

CM 

oc 






1 • 



1 1 



• 1 

1 




1 1 

• • 





0'0^ 

00 oc 

ec 1 

1 

r^vc 

VO VC 

1 1 

VOID 

Lf/LD 

ID 1 

• ID 

LDVO 

VO VC 

1 1 

vovo 

VO 

VO 

Q> 

roro 

coco 

CO 

CO 

CO CO 

coco 


coco 

coco 

CO 

CO 

coco 

coco 


coco 

CO 

CO 





















u 

0) 

> 

< 

.. .. 


if. 

CM If) 

CO 

o 

C-^ID 

VO 


cor^ 

CM 00 

3 


CM 

r^co 

CM^ 



CM 


4-> 

1 1 

1 CO 

VC 

CM 1 

1 ^ 

ID^ 

CO F- 

1 1 

3 CM 

r^r— 

LD 


t o 

^00 

CM VO 

1 1 


VO 

V. 

O. 

1 1 

1 • 


• 1 




1 1 





1 • 



1 1 



c 

Cl 

t 1 

1 IT 

tr. ID 

VC 1 

1 VC 

VO VO 

VO VO 

1 1 

ID ID 


CO 


1 CO 

CM’r— 

f— o 

1 1 


43* 


C/0 









^ 43- 














• • 



■* 1 

■ 



• 




• 

• 





.. .. 



















>1 


oo 

CO 

00 

cco 

00 CM 


O r- 

CC3 


CM 

r^vo 

3LD 


co^ 

LDCO 

CO 



• 

cor^ 

V3 1 

• ^ 

CM CM 

CM ^ 

1 1 

LD 

1^0. 

CM 1 

1 ID 

00 CM 

voc 

1 1 

00 ID 

p— VO 

o 

3 

u 

Oi 


• 1 

1 • 



1 1 




1 • 


• 


1 1 





1 

3 


o^ 1 

1 3> 

3i Oi 

Cl 3) 

1 1 

Ol Ol 

33 

O 1 

1 o 

o 


p-CM 

1 1 

CM CO 

•d^ 

ID 

o 


< 

foro 

CO 

CO 

CO CO 

coco 


CO CO 

coco 


«cf 





•d«3 








*“ 


'' 


'■ 

' 





'' 


’’ 

.. 

' 




CSJ 

o 

00 CM 


CO 3 

VOOl 

LD 

ID 

33 

CM ID 



CO CM 

CM r«* 


ro 

3 

VO 


>> 

1 ^ 

cv • 

O Oi 

1 1 

ID 

^ CM 

^ 1 

1 o 

3 


1 

1 

00 ID 

CO 3 

VO 1 

1 ro 

3. 

LD 



1 • 

• 1 


1 1 



• 1 

1 « 



1 

1 



• 1 

1 * 




3 

1 ^ 

^ • 

^ CO 

1 1 

CO CO 

CO CO 

CO 1 

1 CO 

CM CM 

CM CM 

1 

1 


P“ o 

O 1 

1 o 

3 

CM 




•O' 




^ •O' 




•d ^ 



•d^ 




CO 



• • • • 





r— 




p— r— 









p» 


>> 




















10 

r— CJ 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

Oi o 

f— CM 

CO ^ 

LD VO 

00 

0.0 

p— 

CM 

co^ 

ID VO 

r^oo 

30 


o 


o 










p- CM 

CM CM 

CM CM 

CM CM 

CM CM 

CM CO 

ro 

> 



















.. 

< 




f— CM VC CO 


VO 

ID Ol 

oc CM 


ID CM 

3 3 

ID 



CM 

4d CO 



3 


• 

1 1 

CO O CM Cl 

^ 1 

1 ^ 

CO 

VO VO 

1 1 


3 3 


1 

1 1 

1 9d 

Ol— 

1 1 

o 

00 


u 

1 1 



• 1 

1 • 



1 1 

• • 

• • 


1 

1 1 

1 • 


1 1 




0^ 

1 1 

coif) 

if) ^ 

^ 1 

1 CO 

CO ^ 

CO CO 

1 1 

•d CO 

CM CM 

CO 

1 

1 1 

1 CO •d <- 

1 1 


CO 


c 


CO CO CO CO 

CO 

CO 

CO CO 

C*'; CO 


coco 

CO CO 

CO 



CO 

CO CO 


CO 

CO 




r— 







1— p- 


p- 




p— 






r«- o 


ID LD 

VO CM 


VO 

CM 

r—OC 


p— ^ 

3 


00 

3 

00 LD 3 VO 




• 

CO 

i 1 

3t VO 

CM ID 

ID 1 

1 VO 

f— 

r*^ 

1 1 

00 P- 

LD 

1 

1 

1 o 

p-c CMC 




> 


1 1 



• 1 




1 1 



1 

• 1 

1 • 






o 

VO 

1 1 

r*- 00 

Oi Oi 

3 1 

1 o 

f— o 

O 3 

1 1 

00 3 


1 

VO 1 

1 

VO LD 

^43* 


00 



CO CO 


CO CO 

CO CO 

CO 



^ CO 


CO CO 

CO 


CO 

CO 

CO CO 

roro 


CO 





•“ ^ 





^ p- 






*“ 

p— p- 

^ p— 






VO CM 

CM 





f— 00 

00 CM 



or^o 

f— CO 


P- LD 


3 


• 


VO 

oc 1 

1 ^ 

P- 00 

CO oc 

1 1 

3 OC 

o 

r*- 1 

I 

ID CM ID 

LD ^ 

1 1 

3 CM 

r*- 

3 


4-> 



• 1 

1 • 



1 1 



• 1 

1 




1 1 






^ ir> 

ID VD VO 1 

1 ID 

ID ID 

ID ID 

1 1 

ID ID 

VO VC 

VO 1 

1 

VO VO VD 

VO VO 

1 1 

LD VO 

VO 

LD 


CO CO 

CO CO CO 

CO 

CO CO 

CO CO 


CO CO 

CO CO 

CO 


CO CO CO 

CO ro 


CO CO 

CO 

ro 

>> 







P“ r— 



p- p- 







p* ^ 



fO 

•• 



















Zi 




00 CO 

Oi 


CO 

^ 00 


CM 3 

O 3 

LD 



o 

00 LD 



LD 



1 1 

1 CO ^ iO 

1 

1 CM 

ID Cl 

o o 

1 1 

f— 

O CM 

ID 

1 

1 

VO 00 

CM o 

1 1 


00 


O. 

I 1 

1 • 


• 1 

1 • 



1 1 




1 

1 • 



1 1 


• 


Cl 

1 1 

1 VC VO VO 

VC 1 

1 ID 

CM 

ro CM 

t 1 

P» o' 

f— o 

3 

1 

1 3 

00 VO 


1 1 




to 


^ ^ 

«3* 


4a- ^ 

^ •0' 


«9- ^ ^ ^ 

CO 


CO 

CO CO 

CO CO 



d- 
















^ p- 

p— p» 






o o 

CM 

ID 

Cl 

ro «sj- 


VO P- 

00 3 

VD 



O ID ^ 


00 00 

VO 00 

00 

CO 


• 

LD 

CO 1 

1 00 

ID CM 

CM CM 

1 1 

o ^ 

3 3 

VC 1 

1 LD 

CM 

CO 

p- VO 

1 1 

ID CM 

«3- CO 

r— 



31 



1 • 



1 1 



• 1 

1 • 




1 1 






3 

CO 00 

O' i 

1 00 

oc Cl 

^ CM 

1 1 

CM CM 

p~ ^ 

CM 1 

1 CM 

CO ^ LD ^ 

1 1 

O 3 

CO 00 

00 

ro 


<C 

CO CO 

CO 

CO 

CO CO 




•d- «d* 




^ ^ 43- 


D ^ 

^ •d 

•d 




r“ 


f— 

r- ^ 

r- r- 


f— 1— 








p— p— 

P“ 





VO 


CM VO 



00 CO 

Ol 

CM 

ID CO 

P- o 



3 

O P- 

o 

CM 

00 



>> 

o> 

if) 

o 


o o 

CO p— 

CO 


ID LD 

p» ^ 



CO 

»3- 00 

3 

CO 

3 

p— 



1 « 

• 1 


1 1 



• 1 

1 • 



1 

1 



• 1 

1 i 


o 


3 

1 CO 

CO 1 

^ CO 

1 1 

CO CO 

t— o 

O 1 

1 ^ 

»— o o o 

1 

1 

O 3 

O CO 

00 1 

1 00 



•-D 

1 4J* 

^ 1 


1 1 



^ 1 

1 ^ 



1 

1 

^ CO 

•d CO 

CO 1 

1 CO 

CO 

f— 





p- r— 




*“ 



f— p- 



P” p— 

p— p— 






O 




















4-> 






































0) 


a 






f— CM 

CO ^ 

ID VO 

00 

3 O 


CM CO 43- 

LD VO 00 3 O 

p" 

> 



f— CO 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

3» f— 




^ p- 

p— CM 

CM 

CM CM CM 

CM CM 

CM CM 

CM CO 

CO 

cc 


28 


January 1985 Horticultural and Tropical Products Division, FAS/IISDA 


FIGURE 1 


FIGURE 1 


INTERNAHONM. COFFEE AGREEMENT 
COMPOSITE AVERAGE PRICES. FOR COFFEE 
1978-1984: COMPARISON WITH 
PRICE RANGES UNDER ICO, 1980-1984. 


ss.ao-j 

J 

I 

j 

HiMLO come raicES am 
CALCULATeO BY THE ICO 



SO aO' 


'Inn’r 


JFMAMJJA a OMOJPMAMJJA S OHOJFWAWJJA SOM OJEMAMJJAaONOJFHAMJJASONOJfMAi^JJASONOJFMAMJJASOWO 


1970 


1979 


1990 


1991 

TBAS 


1992 


1993 


1994 


* Th9 ioOleocor prte* lo 9 eo9poslt9 of eho oa-Ooek Mow York snO Haaburg- 
prlcoa of "Ochor Nil4 Arabico' «od oa>ooek Now York «nd :iars 9 illos'> 

LoHavrs prieao of Robitoco^ypa grooo coffaa* Tha oirOock prica of a coasMOicy 
laeludaa cha coses of aaktng cha goods avallabla ac docksida of cho port naaad. 

Sooreot Coapliod fro« ICO data raporeod by eho U.S. Oopareaane of Agrl- 
euleuro and eho U.S* Oapareaaae of Coaaoreo. 

Prepared by the Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress 


29 



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4.00 

7.00 

10009 

All 24 Reports Listed Above 

41.00 

58.00 


Grains: 



10010 

World Grain Situation & Outlook (16 issues) 

28.00 

41.00 

10011 

Export Markets for U.S. Grain (12 issues) 

20.00 

30.00 

10013 

USSR Grain Situation & Outlook (12 issues) 

15.00 

20.00 

10014 

All 40 Reports Listed Above 

63.00 

91.00 

10015 

Horticultural Products (12 issues) 

20.00 

30.00 

10016 

Oilseeds & Products (13 issues) 

27.00 

42.00 

10017 

Seeds (4 issues) 

9.00 

15.00 

10018 

Sugar, Molasses & Honey (3 issues) 

5.00 

8.00 

10019 

Tea, Spices & Essential Oils (3 issues) 

5.00 

7.00 

10020 

Tobacco (12 issues) 

25.00 

40.00 

10021 

World Crop Production (12 issues) 

18.00 

25.00 

10023 

Wood Products (4 issues) 

7.00 

10.00 


Total Reoorts Ordered 




Total Subscription Price 



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Horticultural and Tropical Products Division circular release dates for 1985 
are as follows: 

January 8 Horticultural Products Review 

15 World Coffee Situation 

February 8 Horticultural Products Review 

March 6 World Cocoa Situation 

8 Horticultural Products Review 

15 World Tobacco Situation 

April 8 Horticultural Products Review 

16 World Tobacco Situation 

May 8 Horticultural Products Review 

15 World Sugar and Molasses Situation 

June 10 Horticultural Products Review 

July 8 Horticultural Products Review 

16 World Coffee Situation 

August 8 Horticultural Products Review 

September 9 Horticultural Products Review 

October 9 Horticultural Products Review 

25 World Cocoa Situation 

November 8 Horticultural Products Review 

15 World Sugar and Molasses Situation 

December 9 Horticultural Products Review